Category Archives: History and Context (Western Philosophy)

HCJ FOUR: (The New Journalism) Tom Wolfe

New Journalism New Journalism was an American literary movement in the 1960s and ’70s that pushed the boundaries of traditional journalism and nonfiction writing. Tom Wolfe was one of the most influential promoters of the New Journalism but gave credit to Gay Talese for establishing the New Journalism … Continue reading

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HCJ FOUR: Sartre, Kierkegaard, Husserl & Heidegger

Sartre, Kierkegaard, Husserl and Heidegger: Existentialism Phenomenology and Existentialism: Sartre: “Existence precedes essence” – Jean Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness. Existentialism is the philosophy of human existence that relates to one’s pursuit of the meaning of life. Although existentialism is generally considered … Continue reading

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HCJ FOUR: (Economics) Smith to Keynes

History of Economic Theory 18th century: Adam Smith and free trade: “Civil government, so far as it is instituted for the security of property, is in reality instituted for the defense of the rich against the poor, or of those … Continue reading

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HCJ FOUR: Totalitarianism (My Seminar Paper) Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism analyses the two major totalitarian movements of the 20th century, Nazism and Stalinism. Totalitarianism differs from other forms of political oppression such as despotism (a single entity rules with absolute power), tyranny (cruel and aggressive government or rule) and … Continue reading

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HCJ FOUR: Frege to Wittgenstein

Logic and Mathematics Frege: 1876: Begriffschrift (trs: ‘concept script’) This is ‘analytic’ or ‘symbolic’ logic which replaces the syllogistic logic of Aristotle. Aristotle: A = man [b] = mortal X = Socrates All [A]s are [b]  {axiom; apriori} X is [a] Therefore X is … Continue reading

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HCJ THREE: Freud

Freud and Psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud is described by Anthony Kenny as the Continental thinker who had the ‘greatest influence’ on Anglo-American philosophical thought. Freud regarded himself as a scientist and was an inventor of a new science rather than a … Continue reading

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HCJ THREE: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Nietzsche (1844-1900) is regarded as the successor of Schopenhauer (https://brackenstockley.wordpress.com/2013/03/23/hcj-hegel-and-schopenhauer/). Like Schopenhauer, Nietzsche’s view of women was very poor. In his “pseudo-prophetical” book, Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-1885), he says that women are not, as yet, capable of friendship; they are … Continue reading

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